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The Stein Salon Library – Background Information and Biographies

This project was made for a course in the University College Dublin Master’s in Library and Information Systems in collaboration with Robert Alfis, John Kiely, Dermot O’Leary, and Patrick Thompson.


The Stein Salon Library - img Banner 000 Background & Bios
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27 Rue de Fleurus
Entrée into the Stein salon was a sought-after validation, and Stein became combination mentor, critic, and guru to those who gathered around her, including Ernest Hemingway, who described the salon in A Moveable Feast. The principal attraction was the collection of Paul Cézanne oils and watercolors and the early pictures by Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso which Gertrude and Leo had had the funds and the foresight to buy. The walls of their atelier at 27 rue de Fleurus were hung to the ceiling with now-famous paintings, the double doors of the dining room were lined with Picasso sketches. On a typical Saturday evening one would have found Gertrude Stein at her post in the atelier, garbed in brown corduroy, sitting in a high-backed Renaissance chair, her legs dangling, next to the big cast-iron stove that heated the chilly room. A few feet away, Leo Stein would expound to a group of visitors his views on modern art.
27 Rue de Fleurus. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/27_rue_de_Fleurus
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Gertrude Stein
(1874-1946)
Modernist author Gertrude Stein was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, on February 3, 1874. Stein moved to Paris in 1903, embarking on a literary career that produced Tender Buttons and Three Lives, as well as work dealing with homosexual themes. Stein was also a prolific art collector and the host of a salon that included expatriate writers Ernest Hemingway, Sherwood Anderson and Ezra Pound.
Biography.com Editors (2015). Gertrude Stein. Biography.com. Retrieved from http://www.biography.com/people/gertrude-stein-9493261
 
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Salvador Dalí
(1904-1989)
Salvador Dalí was born on May 11, 1904, in Figueres, Spain. From an early age, Dalí was encouraged to practice his art and would eventually go on to study at an academy in Madrid. In the 1920s, he went to Paris and began interacting with artists such as Picasso, Magritte, and Miró, which led to Dalí’s first Surrealist phase. He is perhaps best known for his 1931 painting The Persistence of Memory, showing melting clocks in a landscape setting. The rise of fascist leader Francisco Franco in Spain led to the artist’s expulsion from the Surrealist movement, but that didn’t stop him from painting. Dalí died in Figueres in 1989.
Biography.com Editors (2015). Salvador Dalí. Biography.com. Retrieved from http://www.biography.com/people/salvador-dal-40389
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Pablo Picasso
(1881-1973)
Born in Málaga, Spain, in 1881, Pablo Picasso, became one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century and the creator (with Georges Braque) of Cubism. A Spanish expatriate painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist and stage designer, Picasso was considered radical in his work. He first came to Paris in 1900 and spent much of his career here painting such seminal works as Les Demoiselles d’Avignon and Guernica. After a long prolific career, he died on April 8, 1973, in Mougins, France. The enormous body of Picasso’s work remains, however, and the legend lives on—a tribute to the vitality of the “disquieting” Spaniard with the “sombrepiercing” eyes who superstitiously believed that work would keep him alive. For nearly 80 of his 91 years, Picasso devoted himself to an artistic production that contributed significantly to—and paralleled the entire development of—modern art in the 20th century.
Biography.com Editors (2015). Pablo Picasso. Biography.com. Retrieved from http://www.biography.com/people/pablo-picasso-9440021
Wikipedia Editors (2015). Pablo Picasso. Wikipedia.com. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pablo_Picasso
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Ernest Hemingway
(1899-1961)
Born on July 21, 1899, in Cicero (now in Oak Park), Illinois, Ernest Hemingway served in World War I and worked in journalism before publishing his story collection In Our Time. He was renowned for novels like The Sun Also RisesA Farewell to ArmsFor Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea, which won the 1953 Pulitzer. In 1954, Hemingway won the Nobel Prize. He committed suicide on July 2, 1961, in Ketchum, Idaho.
Biography.com Editors (2015). Ernest Hemingway. Biography.com. Retrieved from http://www.biography.com/people/ernest-hemingway-9334498
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F. Scott Fitzgerald
(1896-1940)
F. Scott Fitzgerald was born on September 24, 1896, in St. Paul, Minnesota. His first novel’s success made him famous and let him marry the woman he loved, but he later descended into drinking and his wife had a mental breakdown. Following the unsuccessful Tender is the Night, Fitzgerald moved to Hollywood and became a scriptwriter. He died of a heart attack in 1940, at age 44, his final novel only half completed.
Biography.com Editors (2015). F. Scott Fitzgerald. Biography.com. Retrieved from http://www.biography.com/people/f-scott-fitzgerald-9296261

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